Found from 2012 ~Music Sales Up For the First Time in Seven Years

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It has been widely known that the US music industry has been suffering for the past decade or so at the hands of illegal downloading and streaming services. But this past year, the turn tables have spun back towards the music producers. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has announced its official sales figures for 2011, revealing a slight but notable increase. Overall, the industry brought in $7.01 billion last year —the first gain for the industry since 2004.

Digital sales made up 50% of all shipments. Digital album downloads pushed past the 100 million-unit mark for the first time ever (1.09 million) and digital sales were up 25 percent at $1.1 billion. Music subscription services made a mark as well, as revenue increased 13 percent to a high of $241 million.

As digital and online services take over, CDs are continuing a descent into obscurity, following through on a consistent decline. CD sales dropped 4.8 percent in units shipped and 8.5 percent in dollar value from $3.9 billion down to $3.1 billion. Perhaps, in coming years, CDs will follow a path of another music medium once thought to be obsolete. Retro sensibilities made their mark on music sales in 2011 and LP shipments jumped 31.5 percent to 5.5 million units. Shipments of 45s doubled in dollar value to $4.6 million.

All of the RIAA’s data, reported by record labels, includes sales of digital and physical albums and singles, music videos and mobile platforms, including ringtones and ringbacks. For the first time ever, the RIAA report includes synchronization royalties (those paid to artists whose music is synchronized with other content, like movies, TV and video games).

According to the RIAA, 146,493 people are employed by 40,071 music community businesses across the country. Notable achievement for the music industry after years of decline.

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